PreschoolUtah.Com
PreschoolUtah.Com
Teaching Reading in Preschool
WHEN DO CHILDREN LEARN TO READ?   
American Academy on Pediatrics
ARE KIDS GETTING TOO MUCH
MATH AND READING
Samantha Cleaver, Education.com
HOW TO TEACH CHILDREN TO READ
National Institute of Health
Early childhood developmental theory syllogistic reasoning abilities on the part of the child. Most young children do not attain
this form of reasoning until the age of five or six. It makes little sense to focus on intensive reading instruction until then.
Studies show that children enrolled in accelerated academic programs eventually lose whatever gains they made.
Click on any of the links to read the full articles.
According to most experts... it's roughly age 6-7.
Pushing your child to read before she is ready can get in the way of your child's
interest in learning. The love of learning cannot be forced."
A Congressionally mandated, independent panel concluded that the most
effective way to teach children to read is through instruction that includes a
combination of balanced strategies
.
An interesting article that questions the repercussions of a
narrow educational focus.
WHEN DO MOST CHILDREN LEARN TO READ AND WRITE?
The International Reading Association (IRA)
and the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC)

    Joint Position:  
    This is endorsed by almost all of the educational community including American Speech-Language-Hearing
    Association, Association for Childhood Education International, Association of Teacher Educators, Council for
    Early Childhood Professional Recognition, Division for Early Childhood/Council for Exceptional Children, National
    Association of Early Childhood Specialists in State Departments of Education, National Association of Early
    Childhood Teacher Educators, National Association of Elementary School Principals, National Association of State
    Directors of Special Education, National Council of Teachers of English, Zero to Three/National Center for Infants,
    Toddlers, & Families.

    The concepts in this joint position statement are supported by the following organizations: American Academy of
    Pediatrics, American Association of School Administrators, American Educational Research Association, and the
    National Head Start Association.

    The entire position statement including research can be accessed at the link at the bottom.

1. Demonstrate a positive learning attitude. Display a sense of curiosity. Practice personal responsibility for learning.
Demonstrate persistence in completing tasks. Apply prior knowledge and processes to construct new knowledge.
Voluntarily use a variety of resources to investigate topics of interest.

2. Develop social skills and ethical responsibility. Respect similarities and differences in others. Treat others with kindness
and fairness. Follow rules. Include others in learning and play activities. Function positively as a member of a family,
learning group, school, and community. Initiate and respond to social interactions with peers and adults.

3. Demonstrate responsible emotional behaviors. Recognize own values, talents, and skills. Express self in positive ways.
Demonstrate behavior appropriate to the situation. Express feelings appropriately. Meet and respect needs of self and
others.

4. Develop physical skills and personal hygiene. Learn proper care of the body for health and fitness. Develop knowledge
that enhances participation in physical activities and healthy food choices. Display persistence in learning motor skills and
developing fitness. Use physical activity for self-expression.

5. Understand and use basic concepts and skills. Develop phonological and phonemic awareness. Develop expressive
and receptive vocabulary. Develop reasoning and sequencing skills. Demonstrate problem-solving skills. Observe, sort, and
classify objects. Make connections from content areas to application in real life.
WHAT SHOULD YOUR CHILD KNOW BEFORE KINDERGARTEN?
UTAH OFFICE OF EDUCATION
...on reading during the preschool years.

Young children need developmentally appropriate experiences and teaching to support literacy learning. These
include but are not limited to

  • positive, nurturing relationships with adults who engage in responsive conversations with individual children,
    model reading and writing behavior, and foster children's interest in and enjoyment of reading and writing;

  • print-rich environments that provide opportunities and tools for children to see and use written language for a
    variety of purposes, with teachers drawing children's attention to specific letters and words;

  • adults' daily reading of high-quality books to individual children or small groups, including books that positively
    reflect children's identity, home language, and culture;

  • opportunities for children to talk about what is read and to focus on the sounds and parts of language as well as
    the meaning;

  • teaching strategies and experiences that develop phonemic awareness, such as songs, fingerplays, games,
    poems, and stories in which phonemic patterns such as rhyme and alliteration are salient;

  • opportunities to engage in play that incorporates literacy tools, such as writing grocery lists in dramatic play,
    making signs in block building, and using icons and words in exploring a computer game;

  • firsthand experiences that expand children's vocabulary, such as trips in the community and exposure to various
    tools, objects, and materials.

Source: http://www.naeyc.org/about/positions/psread0.asp
Early Childhood experts agree:
Never put your preschool age child on
a memorization treadmill.
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